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March 2023

Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

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Holiday homes 🔥 Static caravans, log cabins and mobile homes make for great holiday hideaways but, given that they are usually made of fairly thin metal, in cooler weather they are not always the cosiest of places in which to relax. Increasingly, people are installing woodburners in their caravan to ensure that the British climate doesn’t reduce the amount of time they can spend there, and to create a snug and homely atmosphere for their family. But many people are still unsure about the feasibility of such a project. A large number of caravan owners still contact us to ask: “Is it possible to install a wood-burning stove in a caravan?” This answer is always a resounding ‘yes’, as long as it is a well-planned and safely carried out by a qualified registered HETAS engineer. Inevitably, there are a lot of considerations along the way. Here are some of the main ones… Fireproof materials Your installation is likely to include changing materials in the vicinity of your new stove. It’s a legal requirement that you don’t have flammable materials next to your stove. That means wood and hardboard must be kept well away. Building a hearth Remember that among those fireproof materials surrounding your stove, it will need to rest on a hearth. This is a requirement for the aforementioned Building Regulations. The hole in the roof Obviously you’ll need to run a flue pipe through the roof of your caravan. And, equally obviously, it’s something you’ll want to get right first time. Do your research before even thinking about making a start on the hole. We recommend using a professional installer. We know that many caravan owners enjoy the challenge of installing their woodburner as a DIY project. But we would recommend you consider bringing in a HETAS-qualified engineer who is well versed in all the legal and safety requirements of your installation. Flue walls There is likely to be wood in the roof structure of your caravan, which poses a fire risk when positioned next to a standard single wall flue pipe. So we recommend a twin wall flue system. Any HETAS engineer would be able to advise you on the most suitable way of achieving this in your caravan. If a stove is something you are interested in for your holiday home, get in touch….& what better than to holiday home from home 🔥 💻 info@stovespecialists.co.uk 📞 08008321860 Message us through our Facebook page 🔥

Holiday homes 🔥 Static caravans, log cabins and mobile homes make for great holiday hideaways but, given that they are usually made of fairly thin metal, in cooler weather they are not always the cosiest of places in which to relax. Increasingly, people are installing woodburners in their caravan to ensure that the British climate

Holiday homes 🔥 Static caravans, log cabins and mobile homes make for great holiday hideaways but, given that they are usually made of fairly thin metal, in cooler weather they are not always the cosiest of places in which to relax. Increasingly, people are installing woodburners in their caravan to ensure that the British climate doesn’t reduce the amount of time they can spend there, and to create a snug and homely atmosphere for their family. But many people are still unsure about the feasibility of such a project. A large number of caravan owners still contact us to ask: “Is it possible to install a wood-burning stove in a caravan?” This answer is always a resounding ‘yes’, as long as it is a well-planned and safely carried out by a qualified registered HETAS engineer. Inevitably, there are a lot of considerations along the way. Here are some of the main ones… Fireproof materials Your installation is likely to include changing materials in the vicinity of your new stove. It’s a legal requirement that you don’t have flammable materials next to your stove. That means wood and hardboard must be kept well away. Building a hearth Remember that among those fireproof materials surrounding your stove, it will need to rest on a hearth. This is a requirement for the aforementioned Building Regulations. The hole in the roof Obviously you’ll need to run a flue pipe through the roof of your caravan. And, equally obviously, it’s something you’ll want to get right first time. Do your research before even thinking about making a start on the hole. We recommend using a professional installer. We know that many caravan owners enjoy the challenge of installing their woodburner as a DIY project. But we would recommend you consider bringing in a HETAS-qualified engineer who is well versed in all the legal and safety requirements of your installation. Flue walls There is likely to be wood in the roof structure of your caravan, which poses a fire risk when positioned next to a standard single wall flue pipe. So we recommend a twin wall flue system. Any HETAS engineer would be able to advise you on the most suitable way of achieving this in your caravan. If a stove is something you are interested in for your holiday home, get in touch….& what better than to holiday home from home 🔥 💻 info@stovespecialists.co.uk 📞 08008321860 Message us through our Facebook page 🔥 Read More »

Any wood-burning stove owner knows the dramatic effect it has on the warmth and cosiness of your home. Using a woodburner fan with your stove will only enhance that. Because woodburner owners also know that a woodburner does not deliver that sudden, intense rush of heat that you get from an open fire. A fire in a wood-burning stove heats the metal around it, and the hot metal then radiates the heat around the room. The result is a more efficient fire and heat that spreads over a wider area than you would get from an open fire, but it’s by no means an immediate process. Using a woodburner fan allows to aid the process by causing the warmth from your stove to spread further and more quickly than would otherwise be the case. A quick think back to school science lessons will tell you that hot air rises, and the hot air created by your woodburner is no different. The outward thrust provided by a stove fan causes the hot air to circulate into the room and not just up to the ceiling. How does a woodburner fan work? A woodburner fan is no different than any other fan in that its blades rotates to encourage the flow of air. Whereas we are more accustomed to seeing this technology deployed to create cold air to cool us on a warm day, in the case of a woodburner fan it is the heated air that is being pushed around the room (and even into adjacent rooms). Since the air directly around the stove is the hottest in the room, circulating this around the room causes it to heat much faster, so you feel the benefits sooner. Where do you install a stove fan? A woodburner fan sits on top of the stove, usually as far back as possible (and always to the rear of the flue pipe). Placing the fan at the back of the stove means it is able to blow the full extend of heat being created across the top of the stove in an outward direction. This is particularly useful if your woodburner sits within a recess or inglenook. Also, the cooler air flow from behind is essential for the fan to be able to power itself. The downward movement of the cooler air when it encounters the warmer air is what drives the blades of the stove fan, so correct placement is essential. StoveSpecialistsUK definitely recommend using a stove fan 🔥

Any wood-burning stove owner knows the dramatic effect it has on the warmth and cosiness of your home. Using a woodburner fan with your stove will only enhance that. Because woodburner owners also know that a woodburner does not deliver that sudden, intense rush of heat that you get from an open fire. A fire

Any wood-burning stove owner knows the dramatic effect it has on the warmth and cosiness of your home. Using a woodburner fan with your stove will only enhance that. Because woodburner owners also know that a woodburner does not deliver that sudden, intense rush of heat that you get from an open fire. A fire in a wood-burning stove heats the metal around it, and the hot metal then radiates the heat around the room. The result is a more efficient fire and heat that spreads over a wider area than you would get from an open fire, but it’s by no means an immediate process. Using a woodburner fan allows to aid the process by causing the warmth from your stove to spread further and more quickly than would otherwise be the case. A quick think back to school science lessons will tell you that hot air rises, and the hot air created by your woodburner is no different. The outward thrust provided by a stove fan causes the hot air to circulate into the room and not just up to the ceiling. How does a woodburner fan work? A woodburner fan is no different than any other fan in that its blades rotates to encourage the flow of air. Whereas we are more accustomed to seeing this technology deployed to create cold air to cool us on a warm day, in the case of a woodburner fan it is the heated air that is being pushed around the room (and even into adjacent rooms). Since the air directly around the stove is the hottest in the room, circulating this around the room causes it to heat much faster, so you feel the benefits sooner. Where do you install a stove fan? A woodburner fan sits on top of the stove, usually as far back as possible (and always to the rear of the flue pipe). Placing the fan at the back of the stove means it is able to blow the full extend of heat being created across the top of the stove in an outward direction. This is particularly useful if your woodburner sits within a recess or inglenook. Also, the cooler air flow from behind is essential for the fan to be able to power itself. The downward movement of the cooler air when it encounters the warmer air is what drives the blades of the stove fan, so correct placement is essential. StoveSpecialistsUK definitely recommend using a stove fan 🔥 Read More »

A lovely installation of an Ecosy Ottawa wood only 5kw stove by Stove World UK installed by our HETAS engineer in #reading 🔥

A lovely installation of an Ecosy Ottawa wood only 5kw stove by Stove World UK installed by our HETAS engineer in #reading 🔥 Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

A lovely installation of an Ecosy Ottawa wood only 5kw stove by Stove World UK installed by our HETAS engineer in #reading 🔥 Read More »

Clean it Give your stove a good clean over the summer months. Ashes can be corrosive if they’re allowed to sit, so you will want to ensure that you’ve got rid of them all before your stove is out of use for any extended period. Get your chimney swept No doubt your woodburner and flue system have taken a lot of punishment over the winter months. Remove corrosive soot and creosote from the system and ensure that your stove is ready for action as soon as the temperatures drop by calling upon the services of a chimney sweep. Check for rust If there are any signs of rust on your stove, it’s not going to get any better with time so it is best to stop the problem at this stage. A bit of wire wool and some stove paint will have your appliance looking as good as new. Check your parts You’ll also need to give your stove a once-over MOT to check for any other problems. Things to look for include gaps between the panels, a warped or damaged grate, holes in your baffle, cracked glass and damaged rope. Follow this guide to performing a check-up on your wood-burning stove. Leave the door ajar During the summer months it is best to leave the stove door slightly ajar. This ensures air flow and ventilation to the stove system, which helps to prevent corrosion. Follow those tips and your wood-burning stove should be in prime condition when you next need it.

Clean it Give your stove a good clean over the summer months. Ashes can be corrosive if they’re allowed to sit, so you will want to ensure that you’ve got rid of them all before your stove is out of use for any extended period. Get your chimney swept No doubt your woodburner and flue

Clean it Give your stove a good clean over the summer months. Ashes can be corrosive if they’re allowed to sit, so you will want to ensure that you’ve got rid of them all before your stove is out of use for any extended period. Get your chimney swept No doubt your woodburner and flue system have taken a lot of punishment over the winter months. Remove corrosive soot and creosote from the system and ensure that your stove is ready for action as soon as the temperatures drop by calling upon the services of a chimney sweep. Check for rust If there are any signs of rust on your stove, it’s not going to get any better with time so it is best to stop the problem at this stage. A bit of wire wool and some stove paint will have your appliance looking as good as new. Check your parts You’ll also need to give your stove a once-over MOT to check for any other problems. Things to look for include gaps between the panels, a warped or damaged grate, holes in your baffle, cracked glass and damaged rope. Follow this guide to performing a check-up on your wood-burning stove. Leave the door ajar During the summer months it is best to leave the stove door slightly ajar. This ensures air flow and ventilation to the stove system, which helps to prevent corrosion. Follow those tips and your wood-burning stove should be in prime condition when you next need it. Read More »