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September 2022

A lovely Portway Arundel by Portway Stoves installed by our registered HETAS engineer, with a flexible flue liner, glass rock chamber, slate hearth & finished with an oak beam in #tamworth 🔥

A lovely Portway Arundel by Portway Stoves installed by our registered HETAS engineer, with a flexible flue liner, glass rock chamber, slate hearth & finished with an oak beam in #tamworth 🔥 Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists Ltd – stove installation Stove Specialists Ltd Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, […]

A lovely Portway Arundel by Portway Stoves installed by our registered HETAS engineer, with a flexible flue liner, glass rock chamber, slate hearth & finished with an oak beam in #tamworth 🔥 Read More »

We get asked – and always do our best to answer – a lot of questions by people who are considering buying a wood-burning stove. A significant proportion of those questions start, “Can you install a wood-burning stove…?” With plenty of myths, misconceptions and misinformation floating around, many people are left wondering whether or not installing a woodburner in their property is even possible. So, with that in mind we’re trying to answer as many of those “Can you install a wood-burning stove…?” as we can in one post. Here we go. Can you install a wood-burning stove if you don’t have a chimney? Yes, there is no reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove just because you don’t have a chimney. For most properties without a chimney, a twin wall flue will serve as the ideal chimney replacement. Can you install a wood-burning stove yourself? Logistically, yes, you can install a wood-burning stove yourself: it can be a fairly straightforward DIY job. But there are a few reasons why we recommend you leave the installation to a professional who is HETAS registered. Firstly, it’s not like putting up some shelves and one falling down. If you get something wrong with a stove installation, you’re potentially allowing poisonous gases into your home. Secondly, if you do the installation yourself, you will still need a HETAS engineer to check and certify the job to get a Certificate of Compliance. Registered HETAS engineers can self-certify the installation as being in compliance with building standards. Can you install a wood-burning stove without a flue liner? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove without a flue liner as long as the stove is connected to a sound chimney that’s functioning properly. The advantage of using a flue liner even if you do have a good chimney is to improve performance. The draw up a flue pipe with a six-inch diameter should be stronger than up an open chimney. This can provide a more efficient burn, as well as minimising flue gases condensing in the chimney and forming creosote deposits. However we would always recommend a flue liner with every installation. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a flat? There is no specific reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove in a flat, but there are a number of complications. If your flat has an existing fireplace, you’ll need to check – logistically and legally – how it connects with other fireplaces in your building. Ideally, you’ll want your fireplace to have its own flue right the way to the chimney pot, so that your installation doesn’t really impact on other flats. If there’s no existing fireplace, you’ll need to work out how to install a twin wall flue. If that entails running a flue pipe up the side of several neighbouring flats, you would need permission from each property. Can you install a wood-burning stove in an existing fireplace? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in an existing fireplace. The simplest way of doing so is by installing a inset stove, which will slot straight into a standard fireplace opening without the need for any building work to open up the fireplace. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a conservatory? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a conservatory. As with any other room in your home, the installation must comply with building regulations. The aspect of the regulations that might be slightly trickier than in other rooms is adhering to the minimum distance to flammable materials, particularly when it comes to installing a flue through a polycarbonate conservatory roof. This can be achieved through the use of a twin wall flue and rubber flashing. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a new home? Unless your developer has made you agree to conditions to the contrary (which would be very unusual) there is no reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove in a new home. The only requirement would be compliance with wood-burning stove building regulations. Even if the new build property has no chimney, a woodburner installation could be achieved with the use of a twin wall flue. You will need to ensure the flue outlet height, hearth design and size and distance between the stove and combustible materials are in accordance with the regulations. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a mobile home? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a mobile home. Since mobile homes are not covered by building regulations, the onus is on you and your installer to ensure the installation is safe. This includes making sure your stove is a suitable distance away from flammable materials. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a kitchen? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a kitchen, but you are likely to need a woodburner with an external air supply. Until a couple of years ago, you weren’t allowed to install a stove in a room in which there was any form of mechanical extraction in operation. This included the use of extractor fans that are above the vast majority of cookers due to fears that the fan could ‘pull’ harmful gases into the room. New regulations permit such installation as long as the stove has an external air supply that makes it independent of the ventilation within the kitchen. Can you install a wood-burning stove if you live in a city? Yes, urban dwellers are just as entitled to the warmth of a woodburner as the rest of us. You can install a woodburner even if you live in a smoke control area, one of the designated zones in which burning fuel was banned in to tackle smog in the 1960s. In order to install a wood-burning stove that can be used in a smoke control area you simply need to choose a DEFRA exempt wood burner(StoveSpecialistsUK always recommend DEFRA approved stoves as standard). These are appliances designated for use in smoke control areas by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. See our full range of DEFRA exempt stoves on our website. We hope that this article has answered all of your ‘Can you install a wood-burning stove…?’ questions. If not, feel free to leave your question as a comment below and we’ll do our best to answer it for you 🔥

We get asked – and always do our best to answer – a lot of questions by people who are considering buying a wood-burning stove. A significant proportion of those questions start, “Can you install a wood-burning stove…?” With plenty of myths, misconceptions and misinformation floating around, many people are left wondering whether or not

We get asked – and always do our best to answer – a lot of questions by people who are considering buying a wood-burning stove. A significant proportion of those questions start, “Can you install a wood-burning stove…?” With plenty of myths, misconceptions and misinformation floating around, many people are left wondering whether or not installing a woodburner in their property is even possible. So, with that in mind we’re trying to answer as many of those “Can you install a wood-burning stove…?” as we can in one post. Here we go. Can you install a wood-burning stove if you don’t have a chimney? Yes, there is no reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove just because you don’t have a chimney. For most properties without a chimney, a twin wall flue will serve as the ideal chimney replacement. Can you install a wood-burning stove yourself? Logistically, yes, you can install a wood-burning stove yourself: it can be a fairly straightforward DIY job. But there are a few reasons why we recommend you leave the installation to a professional who is HETAS registered. Firstly, it’s not like putting up some shelves and one falling down. If you get something wrong with a stove installation, you’re potentially allowing poisonous gases into your home. Secondly, if you do the installation yourself, you will still need a HETAS engineer to check and certify the job to get a Certificate of Compliance. Registered HETAS engineers can self-certify the installation as being in compliance with building standards. Can you install a wood-burning stove without a flue liner? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove without a flue liner as long as the stove is connected to a sound chimney that’s functioning properly. The advantage of using a flue liner even if you do have a good chimney is to improve performance. The draw up a flue pipe with a six-inch diameter should be stronger than up an open chimney. This can provide a more efficient burn, as well as minimising flue gases condensing in the chimney and forming creosote deposits. However we would always recommend a flue liner with every installation. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a flat? There is no specific reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove in a flat, but there are a number of complications. If your flat has an existing fireplace, you’ll need to check – logistically and legally – how it connects with other fireplaces in your building. Ideally, you’ll want your fireplace to have its own flue right the way to the chimney pot, so that your installation doesn’t really impact on other flats. If there’s no existing fireplace, you’ll need to work out how to install a twin wall flue. If that entails running a flue pipe up the side of several neighbouring flats, you would need permission from each property. Can you install a wood-burning stove in an existing fireplace? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in an existing fireplace. The simplest way of doing so is by installing a inset stove, which will slot straight into a standard fireplace opening without the need for any building work to open up the fireplace. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a conservatory? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a conservatory. As with any other room in your home, the installation must comply with building regulations. The aspect of the regulations that might be slightly trickier than in other rooms is adhering to the minimum distance to flammable materials, particularly when it comes to installing a flue through a polycarbonate conservatory roof. This can be achieved through the use of a twin wall flue and rubber flashing. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a new home? Unless your developer has made you agree to conditions to the contrary (which would be very unusual) there is no reason why you can’t install a wood-burning stove in a new home. The only requirement would be compliance with wood-burning stove building regulations. Even if the new build property has no chimney, a woodburner installation could be achieved with the use of a twin wall flue. You will need to ensure the flue outlet height, hearth design and size and distance between the stove and combustible materials are in accordance with the regulations. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a mobile home? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a mobile home. Since mobile homes are not covered by building regulations, the onus is on you and your installer to ensure the installation is safe. This includes making sure your stove is a suitable distance away from flammable materials. Can you install a wood-burning stove in a kitchen? Yes, you can install a wood-burning stove in a kitchen, but you are likely to need a woodburner with an external air supply. Until a couple of years ago, you weren’t allowed to install a stove in a room in which there was any form of mechanical extraction in operation. This included the use of extractor fans that are above the vast majority of cookers due to fears that the fan could ‘pull’ harmful gases into the room. New regulations permit such installation as long as the stove has an external air supply that makes it independent of the ventilation within the kitchen. Can you install a wood-burning stove if you live in a city? Yes, urban dwellers are just as entitled to the warmth of a woodburner as the rest of us. You can install a woodburner even if you live in a smoke control area, one of the designated zones in which burning fuel was banned in to tackle smog in the 1960s. In order to install a wood-burning stove that can be used in a smoke control area you simply need to choose a DEFRA exempt wood burner(StoveSpecialistsUK always recommend DEFRA approved stoves as standard). These are appliances designated for use in smoke control areas by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. See our full range of DEFRA exempt stoves on our website. We hope that this article has answered all of your ‘Can you install a wood-burning stove…?’ questions. If not, feel free to leave your question as a comment below and we’ll do our best to answer it for you 🔥 Read More »

Lighting Your Fire for the First Time This Autumn For some, the autumn means an end to warm evenings, and an end to holiday fun and so much more…but these people clearly don’t have a lovely log burner, because for those of us that do there is always a frisson of excitement when it gets cold enough to bring up the question “shall we light the fire?”. If you have a stove you will be well aware of this wonderful consolation for the summer going. Already people are chatting about it at the school gates or in the pub “have you had yours on yet?”. However, before lighting the fire for the first time this autumn here are a few important tips that might make things run a little smoother. A room full of smoke is not uncommon for people lighting their fire for the first time in the autumn so follow these tips and avoid the pitfalls! Do I Need My Chimney Swept Every Year? The basic answer here is yes. It is always best practice to have it swept once a year before you start using it. It is not ideal to have it swept in the spring and not checked again because birds can nest in chimneys over the summer, debris can find its way in there among other things. Lighting the Fire for the First Time Now you know your chimney is clear it is time to light your stove. As always, make sure you have some high quality well seasoned or kiln dried wood to burn as well as some good kindling and newspaper. Warming the flue This is really important and will help get the fire working well the first time. There are a few ways to do this but the main aim here is to get the flue warm so the warm air can travel up properly creating a draw at the bottom and feeding the fire properly. A cold flue will not work as well and can cause smoke to come back into the room. You can use a fire lighter just left to burn out or a small pile of kindling. ideally, let something small burn for a good 10-30 mins to really get that flue warm. Setting the Fire Normally you may set a fire in a certain way but because you have been warming the flue you must be careful when setting the full fire. Newspaper is always good as are firelighters. Place them where the initially small fire was and light, you may not need to do this as there may be enough heat to get it going. Ideally, the newspaper balled up or twisted into tight lengths can sit in the grate without catching straight away. Place some kindling in a cone or pyramid shape over them and light with a long match. Make sure there is plenty of room for air to come through to get to the fuel. Stepping it up a gear As is always the case, add more wood or coal carefully and slowly. There is no reason why the fire should burn any slower than usual but as it is the first time since last Winter it is important to take it easy. Consider the weather conditions too, if there is little or no wind it may make things a bit harder and you might be a bit out of practice too! If the fire doesn’t take you can leave it to cool then start again or try adding some more kindling that will burn easier. Sometimes people use left over wood from the previous season and it may have got wet so check before using. Keeping the Fire Healthy in the Autumn and Beyond After the first successful and no doubt very satisfying fire it is well worth clearing out the ash and giving the fire a good check over. It is important to keep the ash pans clear but it is even more so at this stage as you will be able to see any issues or areas they may need attention. Remember – don’t burn rubbish on your fire, don’t burn green/unseasoned wood and treat your fire with respect! The summer may have seen a few new ornaments being placed near the fire, make sure you check the surrounding area and remove anything that should not be close to the heat. If you find any issues with the fire burning or smoke coming back into the room call your chimney sweep. If there are any issues with a fire or stove that we have installed, then give us a call, and we can help. …and remember, don’t be sad about the end of summer, look forward to all those cosy nights by the fire other people miss out on.

Lighting Your Fire for the First Time This Autumn For some, the autumn means an end to warm evenings, and an end to holiday fun and so much more…but these people clearly don’t have a lovely log burner, because for those of us that do there is always a frisson of excitement when it gets

Lighting Your Fire for the First Time This Autumn For some, the autumn means an end to warm evenings, and an end to holiday fun and so much more…but these people clearly don’t have a lovely log burner, because for those of us that do there is always a frisson of excitement when it gets cold enough to bring up the question “shall we light the fire?”. If you have a stove you will be well aware of this wonderful consolation for the summer going. Already people are chatting about it at the school gates or in the pub “have you had yours on yet?”. However, before lighting the fire for the first time this autumn here are a few important tips that might make things run a little smoother. A room full of smoke is not uncommon for people lighting their fire for the first time in the autumn so follow these tips and avoid the pitfalls! Do I Need My Chimney Swept Every Year? The basic answer here is yes. It is always best practice to have it swept once a year before you start using it. It is not ideal to have it swept in the spring and not checked again because birds can nest in chimneys over the summer, debris can find its way in there among other things. Lighting the Fire for the First Time Now you know your chimney is clear it is time to light your stove. As always, make sure you have some high quality well seasoned or kiln dried wood to burn as well as some good kindling and newspaper. Warming the flue This is really important and will help get the fire working well the first time. There are a few ways to do this but the main aim here is to get the flue warm so the warm air can travel up properly creating a draw at the bottom and feeding the fire properly. A cold flue will not work as well and can cause smoke to come back into the room. You can use a fire lighter just left to burn out or a small pile of kindling. ideally, let something small burn for a good 10-30 mins to really get that flue warm. Setting the Fire Normally you may set a fire in a certain way but because you have been warming the flue you must be careful when setting the full fire. Newspaper is always good as are firelighters. Place them where the initially small fire was and light, you may not need to do this as there may be enough heat to get it going. Ideally, the newspaper balled up or twisted into tight lengths can sit in the grate without catching straight away. Place some kindling in a cone or pyramid shape over them and light with a long match. Make sure there is plenty of room for air to come through to get to the fuel. Stepping it up a gear As is always the case, add more wood or coal carefully and slowly. There is no reason why the fire should burn any slower than usual but as it is the first time since last Winter it is important to take it easy. Consider the weather conditions too, if there is little or no wind it may make things a bit harder and you might be a bit out of practice too! If the fire doesn’t take you can leave it to cool then start again or try adding some more kindling that will burn easier. Sometimes people use left over wood from the previous season and it may have got wet so check before using. Keeping the Fire Healthy in the Autumn and Beyond After the first successful and no doubt very satisfying fire it is well worth clearing out the ash and giving the fire a good check over. It is important to keep the ash pans clear but it is even more so at this stage as you will be able to see any issues or areas they may need attention. Remember – don’t burn rubbish on your fire, don’t burn green/unseasoned wood and treat your fire with respect! The summer may have seen a few new ornaments being placed near the fire, make sure you check the surrounding area and remove anything that should not be close to the heat. If you find any issues with the fire burning or smoke coming back into the room call your chimney sweep. If there are any issues with a fire or stove that we have installed, then give us a call, and we can help. …and remember, don’t be sad about the end of summer, look forward to all those cosy nights by the fire other people miss out on. Read More »

A popular choice from our Hunter Stoves range #hunter #woodburner #Fabulous #Albrighton 🔥

A popular choice from our Hunter Stoves range #hunter #woodburner #Fabulous #Albrighton 🔥 Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists Ltd – stove installation Stove Specialists Ltd Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

A popular choice from our Hunter Stoves range #hunter #woodburner #Fabulous #Albrighton 🔥 Read More »

Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists Ltd – stove installation Stove Specialists Ltd Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

Read More »

Wood-burning stove glass will always get dirty. Though using your airwash system properly can help you to minimise the amount of soot and dirt that settles on the glass, with wood or coal being burned at high temperature in such close proximity, it is inevitable that some clouding will still happen. Given that darkening of the glass is unavoidable you will need a way to clean it that will restore it to its sparkling former glory. Cleaning wood-burning stove glass is one of those things that has created a series of unusual methods and tips that different people swear by. Once you find one that works for you, you are likely to stick with it. Here are some ideas for removing dirt from your stove glass: Damp cloth The first port of call is a damp cloth. As with all the other cleaning methods discussed in this article, it should only be undertaken when the appliance is cool. Simply wipe the damp cloth on the inside of the glass in circular motions. In some cases, this will be sufficient to remove the dirt. Newspaper dipped in ashes At first, ashes might seem like a bothersome byproduct of your woodburner. In fact, they can be very useful. Once the ashes are cold, dip a piece of newspaper into them, then apply it to the glass in a circular movement. Devotees claim this is an effective way to remove soot. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Vinegar Vinegar is a useful cleaning product around the home, and many people use it to clean their stove glass. Again, you just need to take a piece of newspaper, dip it into the vinegar, then apply to the glass using a circular motion. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Bicarbonate of Soda Probably our least favoured option on the list, but worth a try if the others aren’t working for your stove, is bicarbonate of soda or baking soda. Simply add a small amount of water to it to create a paste, then apply to the glass. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Stove glass cleaner An easy way to remove soot from your stove glass is to use a specialist stove glass cleaner. It is hard to beat this when it comes to convenience. The product comes in a spray bottle. You just need to squirt it onto the glass using the instructions given by the manufacturer, which usually recommend a clean with a damp cloth beforehand.

Wood-burning stove glass will always get dirty. Though using your airwash system properly can help you to minimise the amount of soot and dirt that settles on the glass, with wood or coal being burned at high temperature in such close proximity, it is inevitable that some clouding will still happen. Given that darkening of

Wood-burning stove glass will always get dirty. Though using your airwash system properly can help you to minimise the amount of soot and dirt that settles on the glass, with wood or coal being burned at high temperature in such close proximity, it is inevitable that some clouding will still happen. Given that darkening of the glass is unavoidable you will need a way to clean it that will restore it to its sparkling former glory. Cleaning wood-burning stove glass is one of those things that has created a series of unusual methods and tips that different people swear by. Once you find one that works for you, you are likely to stick with it. Here are some ideas for removing dirt from your stove glass: Damp cloth The first port of call is a damp cloth. As with all the other cleaning methods discussed in this article, it should only be undertaken when the appliance is cool. Simply wipe the damp cloth on the inside of the glass in circular motions. In some cases, this will be sufficient to remove the dirt. Newspaper dipped in ashes At first, ashes might seem like a bothersome byproduct of your woodburner. In fact, they can be very useful. Once the ashes are cold, dip a piece of newspaper into them, then apply it to the glass in a circular movement. Devotees claim this is an effective way to remove soot. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Vinegar Vinegar is a useful cleaning product around the home, and many people use it to clean their stove glass. Again, you just need to take a piece of newspaper, dip it into the vinegar, then apply to the glass using a circular motion. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Bicarbonate of Soda Probably our least favoured option on the list, but worth a try if the others aren’t working for your stove, is bicarbonate of soda or baking soda. Simply add a small amount of water to it to create a paste, then apply to the glass. Wipe clean with a damp cloth. Stove glass cleaner An easy way to remove soot from your stove glass is to use a specialist stove glass cleaner. It is hard to beat this when it comes to convenience. The product comes in a spray bottle. You just need to squirt it onto the glass using the instructions given by the manufacturer, which usually recommend a clean with a damp cloth beforehand. Read More »

Energy prices increasing Get in touch with us at StoveSpecialistsUK to lower the cost of heating your home 🔥

Energy prices increasing Get in touch with us at StoveSpecialistsUK to lower the cost of heating your home 🔥 Latest update from Stove Specialists Ltd via Stove Specialists Ltd – stove installation Stove Specialists Ltd Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

Energy prices increasing Get in touch with us at StoveSpecialistsUK to lower the cost of heating your home 🔥 Read More »