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A lovely installation of an Ecosy+ Ottawa 5Kw wood only stove by Stove World UK all installed by our HETAS registered engineer in #Gloucester πŸ”₯

A lovely installation of an Ecosy+ Ottawa 5Kw wood only stove by Stove World UK all installed by our HETAS registered engineer in #Gloucester πŸ”₯ Latest update from Stove Specialists UK via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

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πŸ”₯ Latest update from Stove Specialists UK via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

7 steps to buying your stove πŸ”₯ Step 1 πŸ”₯ Decide if you want a woodburner or a multi-fuel stove. The first step to buying a wood-burning stove is deciding exactly what you want from your stove. Do you just want it to be able to burn wood? If so, a wood-burning stove is the right option. If you want to burn other fuels too, you will need a multi-fuel stove. Step 2 πŸ”₯ Work out what size you need. The next stage in narrowing your choice of stoves is to decide on a specific size of stove you need. This will involve finding an appliance with a heat output suited to the size of the room in which you will be installing the stove. Our engineer will be happy to guide you. Step 3 πŸ”₯ Set a budget. Wood-burning stoves are available for less than a few hundred pounds and prices run into the thousands. It all depends what you want from your appliance in terms of size, design and brand. Working out how much you want to spend will help to sharpen your focus as to the sort of stoves that are available to you. If the stove you want is a bit outside your current budget, finance options are available. Step 4 πŸ”₯ Check the installation process. When setting your budget, remember that you will need some of your finances to install the stove as well as buy it. A member of the StoveSpecialistsUK will be able to give you a rough idea of cost over the phone, we offer installation only or package deals with your stove included. Step 5 πŸ”₯ Think about the design. Armed with all that information, you are now well placed to pick out an appliance that is both attainable and suitable. At this stage, you can start to think about whether you’d prefer a stove that is made from cast iron or steel, contemporary or traditional in style, free-standing or inset in design. Of course, you will also want a stove that is well-suited to your property and its decor. Step 6 πŸ”₯ Buy your stove. You can now take the all-important step of buying a stove that ticks all the boxes for you. Step 7 πŸ”₯ Await delivery. It’s time to welcome your new woodburner into your home. All stoves from StoveSpecialistsUK are delivered on a pallet all over the UK in three to five days working days, or will come with the engineer on your chosen installation date.

7 steps to buying your stove πŸ”₯ Step 1 πŸ”₯ Decide if you want a woodburner or a multi-fuel stove. The first step to buying a wood-burning stove is deciding exactly what you want from your stove. Do you just want it to be able to burn wood? If so, a wood-burning stove is the …

7 steps to buying your stove πŸ”₯ Step 1 πŸ”₯ Decide if you want a woodburner or a multi-fuel stove. The first step to buying a wood-burning stove is deciding exactly what you want from your stove. Do you just want it to be able to burn wood? If so, a wood-burning stove is the right option. If you want to burn other fuels too, you will need a multi-fuel stove. Step 2 πŸ”₯ Work out what size you need. The next stage in narrowing your choice of stoves is to decide on a specific size of stove you need. This will involve finding an appliance with a heat output suited to the size of the room in which you will be installing the stove. Our engineer will be happy to guide you. Step 3 πŸ”₯ Set a budget. Wood-burning stoves are available for less than a few hundred pounds and prices run into the thousands. It all depends what you want from your appliance in terms of size, design and brand. Working out how much you want to spend will help to sharpen your focus as to the sort of stoves that are available to you. If the stove you want is a bit outside your current budget, finance options are available. Step 4 πŸ”₯ Check the installation process. When setting your budget, remember that you will need some of your finances to install the stove as well as buy it. A member of the StoveSpecialistsUK will be able to give you a rough idea of cost over the phone, we offer installation only or package deals with your stove included. Step 5 πŸ”₯ Think about the design. Armed with all that information, you are now well placed to pick out an appliance that is both attainable and suitable. At this stage, you can start to think about whether you’d prefer a stove that is made from cast iron or steel, contemporary or traditional in style, free-standing or inset in design. Of course, you will also want a stove that is well-suited to your property and its decor. Step 6 πŸ”₯ Buy your stove. You can now take the all-important step of buying a stove that ticks all the boxes for you. Step 7 πŸ”₯ Await delivery. It’s time to welcome your new woodburner into your home. All stoves from StoveSpecialistsUK are delivered on a pallet all over the UK in three to five days working days, or will come with the engineer on your chosen installation date. Read More Β»

A lovely installation of a Portway Rochester 5 by Portway Stoves installed by our HETAS engineer with a chamber created, slate hearth & a mid oak beam, in #marketdrayton πŸ”₯

A lovely installation of a Portway Rochester 5 by Portway Stoves installed by our HETAS engineer with a chamber created, slate hearth & a mid oak beam, in #marketdrayton πŸ”₯ Latest update from Stove Specialists UK via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 …

A lovely installation of a Portway Rochester 5 by Portway Stoves installed by our HETAS engineer with a chamber created, slate hearth & a mid oak beam, in #marketdrayton πŸ”₯ Read More Β»

Is wood a sustainable source? The Forestry Commission estimates that there is enough home grown wood to meet demand & a new SIA Ecodesign Ready stoves require fewer logs to produce the same heat of an open fire or 10 year old stove For woodburning stoves the quality & type of wood burnt greatly affects the performance, the lower the moisture content of the wood, the higher the heat output & the lower the emissions & flue deposits produced We recommend dense woods like oak as your logs, they burn hotter & longer than lighter woods.

Is wood a sustainable source? The Forestry Commission estimates that there is enough home grown wood to meet demand & a new SIA Ecodesign Ready stoves require fewer logs to produce the same heat of an open fire or 10 year old stove For woodburning stoves the quality & type of wood burnt greatly affects …

Is wood a sustainable source? The Forestry Commission estimates that there is enough home grown wood to meet demand & a new SIA Ecodesign Ready stoves require fewer logs to produce the same heat of an open fire or 10 year old stove For woodburning stoves the quality & type of wood burnt greatly affects the performance, the lower the moisture content of the wood, the higher the heat output & the lower the emissions & flue deposits produced We recommend dense woods like oak as your logs, they burn hotter & longer than lighter woods. Read More Β»

Team A πŸ”₯

Team A πŸ”₯ Latest update from Stove Specialists UK via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

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πŸ”₯πŸ”₯πŸ”₯ Latest update from Stove Specialists UK via Stove Specialists UK – stove installation Stove Specialists UK Unit 1C, Chetwynd Lodge Chester Road Newport, Telford TF10 8AB +44-1902-519089

When choosing wood for a fire, it’s important that you know what type you are burning & what is best for a fire. The main reason for the differences are wood density & moisture retention. Wood that is of a high density & high moisture retention being the worst example of firewood, providing little fuel for a fire to burn & burning with a very low intensity. We have ranked the wood types you may use. The ranking going from Very Good to Very Poor. Bear in mind that these ranking assume the wood is in an optimal condition for burning: ie cut into small, dry, pieces. Alder – Poor – The fire it produces is very low heat and does not last long. Not good for any kind of fire. Apple – Good – Produces small but long lasting flame that gives off very little spitting or smoke. Ash – Very Good – Considered the best wood for burning (as the name would suggest). It produces a long lasting flame with a high heat output, it can even be burnt relatively effectively without being dried. Beech – Very Good – Burns very much like Ash, but does not burn well when not dried. Birch – Fair – Produces good heat but bruns very quickly. The unseasoned wood can also cause sap deposits to build up in a stove. Blackthorn – Good – Slow burning with moderate heat output. Very Good for smaller indoor fires. Cedar – Good – Produces good slow burning heat, but tends to spit and leaves sap deposits with prolonged use. Cherry – Good – Very good while in season, with a long lasting hot flame, but is a terrible burning wood when not in season due to high smoke and sap output. Chestnut – Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output. Douglas Fir– Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output, as well as leaving sap deposits in stoves with prolonged use. Elder – Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output. Elm – Fair – Elm is a good burner when dry, the problem is drying the wood as it has a very high moisture retention, taking 2 years to get into a state where the wood is suitable for burning. Eucalyptus – Poor – While it produces a lot of heat, it burns quickly and produces a lot of sap. Using Eucalyptus wood comes with a high risk of a chimney fire, and its short life span makes it unsuitable for a fire pit. Hawthorn – Very Good – The traditional firewood. Very much like Beech Hazel – Good – Good heat but is a moderately fast burner. Holly – Poor – Burns quickly and produces very little heat, but will burn in dry or wet condition, making it easy to start a fire with. Hornbeam – Good – A lot like Birch, it produces good heat, although lasts longer than Birch making it an overall better burning wood. Horse Chestnut – Fair – Produces a good fire heat and lifespan, but spits and sparks a lot, this is less of a problem in a stove but is a safety hazard that must be kept in account. Laburnum – Very Poor – Produces a lot of thick smoke for a very small fire. Do not use. Larch – Fair – Reasonable in both heat and fire life span, but produces a lot of sap if unseasoned. Laurel – Fair – Just like Larch, is a reasonable burning wood but must be seasoned first. Lilac – Good – The smaller branches of the tree make for excellent kindling while the wood itself is a good burner. Lime – Poor – Very little heat output and burns quickly. Maple – Good – Produces a lasting and hot flame. Oak – Good – Oak requires time to season, due to its high density, but is a good burner once seasoned. Pear – Good – Just like Oak, burns well but must be seasoned well. Pine – Fair – A lot like the Eucalyptus for heat output and hazard of a chimney fire, but its flame does last longer, making it a good burner if the correct precautions are taken. Also good for firepits. Plum – Good – Good Heat output and burns fairly slowly. Poplar – Very Poor – Just like Laburnum, poor burner that produces a lot of smoke. Rowan – Very Good – Burns very slowly and produces good heat. An excellent wood type for any fire. Rhododendron – Good – The Wood is very good if it is seasoned, but is otherwise mediocre. Robinia – Fair – A wood that burns slowly and produces good heat, but spits a lot, just like Horse Chestnut. Spruce – Poor – Poor heat and burns quickly. Sycamore – Fair – Good heat output, but burns moderately quickly and must be seasoned first. Sweet Chestnut – Poor – It’s fair for heat and life span, but spits a lot and produces a lot of smoke. Thorn – Very Good – One of the best woods for burning. A long lasting and hot flame with minimal smoke or spitting. Walnut – Fair – Is overall a fair wood for burning. Not especially good or bad for anything. Willow – Poor – Does not burn well even when seasoned. Only thing saving it from being very poor being that it has no hazards attached to it. Yew – Very Good – Very high heat output that lasts a very long time.

When choosing wood for a fire, it’s important that you know what type you are burning & what is best for a fire. The main reason for the differences are wood density & moisture retention. Wood that is of a high density & high moisture retention being the worst example of firewood, providing little fuel …

When choosing wood for a fire, it’s important that you know what type you are burning & what is best for a fire. The main reason for the differences are wood density & moisture retention. Wood that is of a high density & high moisture retention being the worst example of firewood, providing little fuel for a fire to burn & burning with a very low intensity. We have ranked the wood types you may use. The ranking going from Very Good to Very Poor. Bear in mind that these ranking assume the wood is in an optimal condition for burning: ie cut into small, dry, pieces. Alder – Poor – The fire it produces is very low heat and does not last long. Not good for any kind of fire. Apple – Good – Produces small but long lasting flame that gives off very little spitting or smoke. Ash – Very Good – Considered the best wood for burning (as the name would suggest). It produces a long lasting flame with a high heat output, it can even be burnt relatively effectively without being dried. Beech – Very Good – Burns very much like Ash, but does not burn well when not dried. Birch – Fair – Produces good heat but bruns very quickly. The unseasoned wood can also cause sap deposits to build up in a stove. Blackthorn – Good – Slow burning with moderate heat output. Very Good for smaller indoor fires. Cedar – Good – Produces good slow burning heat, but tends to spit and leaves sap deposits with prolonged use. Cherry – Good – Very good while in season, with a long lasting hot flame, but is a terrible burning wood when not in season due to high smoke and sap output. Chestnut – Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output. Douglas Fir– Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output, as well as leaving sap deposits in stoves with prolonged use. Elder – Poor – Produces a very small flame with a low heat output. Elm – Fair – Elm is a good burner when dry, the problem is drying the wood as it has a very high moisture retention, taking 2 years to get into a state where the wood is suitable for burning. Eucalyptus – Poor – While it produces a lot of heat, it burns quickly and produces a lot of sap. Using Eucalyptus wood comes with a high risk of a chimney fire, and its short life span makes it unsuitable for a fire pit. Hawthorn – Very Good – The traditional firewood. Very much like Beech Hazel – Good – Good heat but is a moderately fast burner. Holly – Poor – Burns quickly and produces very little heat, but will burn in dry or wet condition, making it easy to start a fire with. Hornbeam – Good – A lot like Birch, it produces good heat, although lasts longer than Birch making it an overall better burning wood. Horse Chestnut – Fair – Produces a good fire heat and lifespan, but spits and sparks a lot, this is less of a problem in a stove but is a safety hazard that must be kept in account. Laburnum – Very Poor – Produces a lot of thick smoke for a very small fire. Do not use. Larch – Fair – Reasonable in both heat and fire life span, but produces a lot of sap if unseasoned. Laurel – Fair – Just like Larch, is a reasonable burning wood but must be seasoned first. Lilac – Good – The smaller branches of the tree make for excellent kindling while the wood itself is a good burner. Lime – Poor – Very little heat output and burns quickly. Maple – Good – Produces a lasting and hot flame. Oak – Good – Oak requires time to season, due to its high density, but is a good burner once seasoned. Pear – Good – Just like Oak, burns well but must be seasoned well. Pine – Fair – A lot like the Eucalyptus for heat output and hazard of a chimney fire, but its flame does last longer, making it a good burner if the correct precautions are taken. Also good for firepits. Plum – Good – Good Heat output and burns fairly slowly. Poplar – Very Poor – Just like Laburnum, poor burner that produces a lot of smoke. Rowan – Very Good – Burns very slowly and produces good heat. An excellent wood type for any fire. Rhododendron – Good – The Wood is very good if it is seasoned, but is otherwise mediocre. Robinia – Fair – A wood that burns slowly and produces good heat, but spits a lot, just like Horse Chestnut. Spruce – Poor – Poor heat and burns quickly. Sycamore – Fair – Good heat output, but burns moderately quickly and must be seasoned first. Sweet Chestnut – Poor – It’s fair for heat and life span, but spits a lot and produces a lot of smoke. Thorn – Very Good – One of the best woods for burning. A long lasting and hot flame with minimal smoke or spitting. Walnut – Fair – Is overall a fair wood for burning. Not especially good or bad for anything. Willow – Poor – Does not burn well even when seasoned. Only thing saving it from being very poor being that it has no hazards attached to it. Yew – Very Good – Very high heat output that lasts a very long time. Read More Β»